The Benefits of Buying A Nursing Staffing Franchise

Buying a nursing staffing franchise has potentially many key benefits when starting a new healthcare agency. Let’s take a look at some of those key benefits are understand the value of proposition when entering into a franchise.

This type of business opportunity has many pros and cons, but we will mainly be looking at the benefits and how they can affect you in your business decision.

Key Benefits:

Benefits #1: Plug and Play

When buying a franchise, you will not have to worry about many aspects of the business startup process. This has been done for you already by the franchise, they typically will provide you with the forms you will need, the logo you will use, you will have to use the franchise name and the software is also provided for you. You will have to abide by their rules and processes. Nothing about what you will have to do will be unique to your franchise. The franchise has rules that you will have to follow and as long as you follow those rules you are allowed to continue managing the franchise.

Benefit #2: As long as you are willing to spend you are fine.

Buying a franchise can be expensive: Typically the fees run from $25,000 to $100,000 for the franchise fee. The franchise fee is the fee they will charge you to allow you to use their name. The Franchise will expect you to represent them is such a way that they determine what that will look like. You will be expected to rent a location, buy furniture, buy their software, etc.

Benefit #3: Ongoing support

You will be charged a continual franchise fee and that fee will depend on your gross sales. Sometimes the fee starts at a certain amount monthly and grows as your gross sales grow. The franchise fee is in place for the franchise company to continue providing you support and the licensing fee to continue using their name. Fees can vary, but typically you can expect between 5% to 10% of gross sales.

Benefit #4: Selling the Franchise

This is a huge benefit, because when you at one point feel this business is no longer what you want and wish to sell it, they typically help you sell the franchise. You will have to typically pay what is called a “Sale Multiplier” basically what that means is you will only get a certain percentage of the sale minus any expenses you owe the franchise. This is something you need to be aware of because the franchise is never really yours, it belong to the franchise company and you must follow the rules.

Taking Meaningful Action

Productivity. Priorities. Planning.

There are a lot of buzz words right now (and they all seem to start with the letter P!) that are intended to help us make the most of our time and efforts.

But in all the buzz about how to get more done, there is surprisingly little talk about what, exactly, we should be doing. Are all “to do” items created equal? Checking things off a list doesn’t guarantee that we are moving ourselves forward.

Growth Activities

Some things on our list need to get done, and you could argue that they are “important.” Many people fill their days doing client projects and customer service. After all, we have to deliver on our promises. But those are not growth activities.

Of course, we also fill a surprising amount of our time with “distractions.” Some are more obvious than others. Many of us lose hours in reading and responding to e-mails, which might feel like “work” but how productive are we really being?

How many of your activities are true “growth activities.” What things will grow your business? Expand your impact? Allow you to make a bigger difference? Really fulfill your purpose?

When you really look at it, those things happen primarily in two ways. When you create things. And when you connect with people.

Create

As a Content Creation Coach, these types of activities are dear to my heart. I see the power of creating new things. Of putting your ideas into tangible pieces. Whether you are writing a blog article or a book, creating a program, shooting a video, making a new presentation… creating things generates value.

You are increasing the assets of your business. You are putting valuable things into the marketplace (even if they don’t cost money). You are giving value that expands your worth and inevitably returns to you.

I often ask people, “What are you creating next to grow your business?”

The most powerful thing about creating content and other pieces in your business is that it gives you something new to share. Creating something new doesn’t mean anything if others don’t see it.

Which leads me to the second type of growth activity…

Connect

When you connect with other people, that is when all sorts of magical things happen. You might end up with a new client. You could find out about a fantastic opportunity. You could impact that person and create a ripple effect in their life and beyond.

The incredible web of possibilities that exists in a conversation with another person is huge. There is a real art to finding the places where your interests, needs, and capabilities intersect. That’s why it’s called “networking”!

Being able to impact someone else is at the core of our purpose. Each of us brings our own area of expertise and focus to each interaction, of course. But if we approach it openly, each conversation is an opportunity to live out our purpose.

That’s real growth.

And business growth follows real growth.

I’ve been spending a lot of my time recently connecting with others. And I often share things that I have created with the people I am connecting with. Sharing value and making a difference. Win win!

Looking at your task list, how many items involve creating something new or connecting with others?(And sitting at your computer writing e-mails doesn’t count!) Identify some real growth activities to put into your schedule.

How Prepared Is Your Board for Cyberspace?

While cyber security is an important issue for boards, it has not always been top of mind. Because a major corporation like Equifax had a breach in its IT system, many companies are rethinking how to secure cyber security.

Boards around the world are examining the Equifax case to determine how to best secure their organizations valuable information stored in their IT systems. So who is responsible? Since the CEO has stepped down, it is apparent he was being held accountable. However, where was the board of directors?

In today’s world of cyberspace, corporate boards have to think about more than governance, CEO compensation and strategy.

As it stands, it is in the board’s best interest to ensure the company is not exposed to debilitating risks. Companies have workplace safety standards and sexual harassment policies to mitigate lawsuits. They even have disaster recovery plans in the event of natural disasters or occurrences like the World Trade Center plane crash. These plans and policies are in place to keep business running smoothly and perpetually. It protects customers and employees.

However, with sophisticated computer hackers around the world, it is no news that computer systems and valuable information can be breached and stolen. There are hackers who breach computer systems as a business. They ask for ransom in the amount of tens of millions of dollars. If it is not paid, they threaten to release the companies secure information, which sometimes could contain private email communication from top executives.

While many enterprises as large as Equifax may have disaster recovery plans for their physical operation, they may not have the same plan for cyber breach. The disaster recovery policies would include immediate action steps based on size of the breach, who made the breach, what information was taken, were company smart phones breached, what to communicate to employees, the public and shareholders as well as other important factors.

In some cases, it may make sense to inform the FBI. In other cases, it may be better to pay the ransom. The challenge with calling the FBI is that the hackers could be in countries like Russia. In Russia, the FBI may not pursue them. Why? Because the Russian government is always looking for good hackers. If the FBI exposes the hackers in Russia, the government may hire them, which can present long-term problems for the US. When it comes to paying ransom, it’s tricky. If you pay, they may hack you again as though you are an ATM machine. If you don’t pay, they may expose confidential information. These are also the kinds of challenges that directly involve the board.

What’s most important is that the board is talking about cyber security before there is a problem. There should be constant audits of the cyber security system to mitigate any risks. In addition, as a board, they should hold the CEO accountable for that security. Furthermore, there should be clear policies to guide the board and the executive team on how to handle the various moving parts in a delicate situation. Boards with disaster recovery plans and high accountability with the CEO are more likely to be forward thinking about cyber vulnerabilities and proactive about updating the security system.

The Worst Cashflow Mistakes Small Business Owners Make

The worst cash flow mistakes a small business owner can make can be counted on one hand. They have one thing in common, and that’s about failing to follow the money. They’re about keeping your eye on the prize, and we go through them here, ending with advice about how to track your own company money using expense management software for small businesses…

Failing to think before you splurge. Great! You’ve started a business. You’re on the road to fame and fortune, and now’s the time to invest in an expensive suit and a new car, isn’t it? No, in short, it isn’t. This is exactly the time NOT to commit money – yours of the company’s – to anything you don’t need. So there’s the first lesson. Understand the difference between ‘want’ and ‘need’. To succeed in business you need a phone, but the Armani suit can wait…

Expecting the best. This is about your financial planning. Understand that you’re not going to be a millionaire in the first year. On the contrary, you’ll be doing well if you can afford to pay yourself anything like a salary in Year One. If you overestimate the number of units you can sell, or the clients you can get to come on board, then revenue will be lower than you predict, and you may find yourself overstretched with any finance package you’ve put in place.

Offering credit. Poor paying suppliers can cripple small businesses. If you’re made to wait for payment, that’s like offering them an interest-free loan, and you shouldn’t do it. It’s perfectly reasonable to ask for payment up front, so long as you’re ready to honour your commitment. After all, you wouldn’t expect the local supermarket to give you a month or more’s credit on your grocery shop (though if you’re a supplier to them, the boot would be on the other foot). In general, large organisations are slower payers, and also have complex internal procedures in place about how and when payments can be made. Better to work with smaller companies, where you have direct access to the person with the power to pay.

Being cash poor. If you’ve made careful and conservative cash flow forecasts in the early days of your business, everything’s fine, so long as cash moves as you’d predicted. But what happens if it doesn’t? If you have no cash cushion you could be in trouble. Try to have a couple of months-worth of cash in the bank so you could carry on if you had no income at all. It’ll help you sleep easier, too.

Not making an unpaid finance assistant work for them. Bet that caught your attention didn’t it? This is not about the kind of modern slavery that has people working for nothing, but it’s about technology. It’s about arming yourself with good quality business expense management software for small businesses and being disciplined in its use. In the early days of your business you need to be especially careful with money, because having little of it generally sharpens the focus in the need to be a good money manager. In later years, when you’ve earned a wedge, there’s no reason to take your foot off the control pedal. Keep a tight rein on finance, and you’ll be rewarded with better dividends in the future. Selection of the right small business expense management software will enable you to keep track of expenses very easily, but more importantly, it will allow you to interrogate the data, and show you how effectively you’re managing spending and cashflow – and show where improvements can be made. And picking the right package means it’ll offer excellent value for money, because the savings you make by using it are probably going to be more than the cost of investing in it in the first place.

Top Four Motivations for Canadians Working Abroad

Canadians working abroad are afforded many opportunities to grow and advance in their careers, a fact which significantly impacts their decision to go overseas. Whether you remain in the Commonwealth, go down to the states or travel to faraway lands, there several good reasons to find employment outside of the country.

1. Living abroad provided opportunities for adventure and personal growth.

At the end of their lives, very few people have regrets about traveling too much or seeing too many foreign countries. Living and working overseas provides opportunities to experience different cultures and gain a broader perspective on world events. Canadians working abroad are more versatile and attractive to future employers because their resumes display a level of self-motivation and perseverance that other job applicants may lack. People who work overseas have demonstrated a level of drive that will set them apart from other people in their field.

2. The Commonwealth makes it uncommonly easy.

While the British Empire is not what it once was, the citizens of the Commonwealth have an advantage when it comes to traveling to other member nations. A citizen of the United States may have an easy time working in one of the territories, but they have a much harder time getting the necessary paperwork to start a career in New Zealand, for example. Countries in South America and Africa are members, and so are Australia and India. In total, there are 53 member states, including several islands in the Caribbean and South Pacific. Canadians working abroad could find employers in any of these areas.

3. You gain additional skills overseas.

Canadians working abroad have opportunities to polish different language skills and learn to adapt to a diverse setting with new challenges. Depending on the country and type of industry, there can be unique regulations or a whole different cultural approach to the situations you encounter. For those who ultimately want to prepare for management roles, it helps to broaden your horizons by seeing how backgrounds and personal dispositions affect attitudes on the job. The ability to look out for yourself in a wide range of settings, even completely new parts of the world, will tell future employers that you need less handholding than your peers.

4. It’s great for family and friendships.

Sure, taking the kids out of school can mean a complicated adjustment, but those who attend school in different parts of the world experience a more inclusive education. Other families may take their kids on a week-long vacation once a year, but yours can have the chance to learn in-depth about other cultures for years at a time. Travel can be a transformative experience, especially for the young. What’s more, the friendships formed elsewhere can be lasting bonds regardless of whether the family eventually moves back to Canada. Back home, the whole family is equipped with interesting stories of life in distant lands, which can be a way to help entertain new friends.